Babies Development (6 months to a year) Health Resources

All babies development at a different pace! Learn about all of baby’s milestones from 6 months to a year.

Baby Development

At 6 months old, your baby is starting to be able to move her body around and starting to become mobile. Around 6 months is also teething time! Remember, all babies are different. If your baby isn’t crawling by 6 months, no worries. If you’re ever unsure, consult your doctor.

Between 6-10 months is when babies start crawling and scooting around. Make sure your home is baby proof!

These few months, baby is learning a lot! She can probably hold objects in her hands, babble, and recognize her name! Your baby is also extremely curious and it probably seems like baby is getting into everything!

Around 8 months, baby will start to understand words like mom, dad, yes, and no! Baby will start to test boundaries when they hear that word. Now’s the time to figure out a disciplinary plan with your partner. If baby ignores your “no” try to distract her with a different activity or toy. Be clear when you’re teaching your baby which behaviors are acceptable. Reward good behavior with cuddles and hugs!

The First Time Your Baby is Sick

It’s inevitable that your baby will get sick during the first year. It’s totally normal! As you get to know your baby, you’ll learn when something’s amiss.

Common ailments your baby will experience are fever, common cold, flu, RSV, ear infection, diarrhea, conjunctivitis, and rash.

Most babies will experience these symptoms and there are many home remedies you can try to help baby feel comfortable as they fight their illness. You can always call the pediatrician’s office to speak to a nurse or take your baby to the doctor. You know your baby best. If something seems wrong, then something probably is wrong. Whenever a newborn is sick (less than 2 months), you should call your doctor.

Common ailments:


Fever
– A low-grade fever isn’t much of a concern, however, if baby’s younger than a year and the fever is 102 or more, call right away. if baby has a fever, give her baby tylenol, give her more fluids, and give her a warm bath.


Cold
– Babies usually go through several colds a year. Give baby some Infant Tylenol, put a humidifier in his room, and make sure to wipe baby’s nose! Encourage drinking lots of fluids and rest.

Flu – Just like a fever or a cold, you treat a flu much the same. Call if baby doesn’t improve after a few days.

Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) – Sounds horrible! RSV is a lung virus, usually in premature babies. The virus can run its course in a few days, but baby’s cough might last two weeks. If baby is having trouble breathing, call right away.


Ear infection
– Unfortunately, ear infections are very common in babies. Most ear infections go away on their own. You can give baby Infants’ Tylenol to help her be comfortable and the doctor might prescribe an antibiotic to relieve the pain.

Diarrhea – Sadly, diarrhea is also very common in babies. Make sure babies drink lots of fluids to avoid dehydration. Diarrhea should clear up in a few days. If you notice your baby has a fever or blood in her stools, call right away.

Conjunctivitis – Pinkeye can make your cute baby’s eyes puffy and red. A viral infection usually has cold symptoms as well (poor baby) and will run its course in about a week. If the infection is bacterial, your doctor will prescribe antibiotic eye drop. As soon as you notice red and puffy eyes, consult a doctor.

Emotional Milestones

By 4 months old, baby will be smiling, laughing, and babbling. Baby should also be able to recognize words like mom, dad, no, yes, and other simple words.
Help your baby learn more words by reading and talking to her every day. Make sure to play with baby as playing is a wonderful way for baby to learn colors, shapes, holding objects and other skills.

Praise and cuddle baby when she learns a new skill!

Every baby is different and develops at his or her own pace. Consult your doctor is baby isn’t smiling, cooing, or responding to simple words like mom and dad by 8 months.

Images by Dave Herholz, ca.gov, cpsc.gov, healthandwelfare.idaho.gov, cdc.gov, libraries.vermont.gov